Sceptre 1080p computer monitor: it’s cheap, but is it good?

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Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

Whether you’re building a PC, adding extra visual workspace, or you need to enlarge your laptops workable area, there are all kinds of reasons to buy a computer monitor. You’ll find options from brands like LG, ViewSonic, Dell, Samsung, MSI and many others. I’ve been looking for the perfect monitor to use with my Apple MacBook Pro; my laptop is only a 14 inch screen, and with all the video editing, photos, and website design I do, I just need to be able to see more things, larger. I’ve recently narrowed down some choices that are extremely popular on Amazon, and that’s what brought me to the Scepter 1080p 24 inch monitor. In this review I’ll look at what you get with this monitor, what your options are for set up and connections, the quality of the screen, and any special features. I’ll let you know if I think it’s a good bet for you.

Sceptre 1080p computer monitor

Summary

Overall, this monitor is just fine. While it’s not much to look at in the design department, and the resolution is basic, it’s a fine monitor for those on a budget.

Pros

  • Decent quality HD monitor
  • Color replication is good
  • Nice contrast ratio
  • easy to work on
  • 2 HDMI ports
  • Easy to set up
  • Thin, light
  • Very small bezels

Cons

  • Uninspiring design
  • May not be sharp enough for some uses

How to choose a monitor

Choosing a monitor is all about your personal workflows. Knowing your exact use cases will help beeline you towards the best path. My strategy is to start off with three specific areas: the maximum price you are willing to pay for the monitor and your use cases for both the short term, and the long term. Focusing on the budget and short-term use case is most important but figuring out your long-term game also helps because monitors last many years, and maybe you don’t want to contribute to e-waste by replacing your monitor every few years.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

For instance, if you do plenty of multitasking, need more screen real estate and do some gaming on the side, you might gravitate towards an ultrawide monitor with low input lag and less emphasis on color accuracy to hit a certain budget target.

Once you have identified your preferences, do your research and either see the monitors up close and personal or look for reviews online and learn the experts’ opinions.





The final step is to make a shortlist of 3 to 5 monitors that tick every box in your list of requirements and identify the key differences of each. Having this data all in front of you really helps in making the best decision.

Should I choose a 1080p or 4K Monitor?

If you want to treat your eyes well, a 4K monitor is the way to go. I remember when Apple introduced the iPhone 4 and didn’t think users needed a super high-resolution display until I actually saw the Retina display and really noticed how much sharper the text and image details were. For monitors, screen resolutions are all about screen real estate and detail and since Windows lets you choose the scaling, you can decide the best balance between the two with larger 4K monitors offering more versatility.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

The question becomes trickier to answer when you add the budget to the equation. Should you spend your $540 CAD on a 4K 27-inch monitor or a gaming-focused 144 Hz 1080p 24-inch monitor? The 4K monitor looks like the more tempting option but you need to identify the monitor’s central features along with any compromises to help hit that price point. If you don’t find any or most of those compromises dealbreakers and other people are happy with the product, go ahead and commit! Even the $171 CAD Sceptre 1080p 24-inch monitor has a few features you wouldn’t find in every 4K monitor.

Sceptre Key Features

Design

The Sceptre 1080p 24-inch monitor has a thin bezel with a slightly thicker chin. It’s not the nicest design, or the sleekest but it gets close.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

The display itself is slim as well making it a good minimalistic monitor choice if you don’t mind the Sceptre logo on the chin.

No height adjustment

It will be important to note that (perhaps understandably) for the price, the monitor doesn’t offer any height adjustment options, but you can tilt the screen a bit.

VESA adapter

It does have a built-in 100mm x 100mm VESA mount. Thanks to the mount, you can buy a monitor arm like the Kensington Monitor arm and instantly gain that flexibility.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

VESA mount uses adapter screws.

I will say the mount does need adapters. Fortunately Scepter includes them in your package. The adaptor screws allow you to attach a VESA mount on the back of the monitor despite its protruding metal connector for its own stand. I don’t understand why scepter wouldn’t just use a traditional VESA adapter, but this solution still works.

Ports and connections

On the connections side, the main highlight of this Sceptre monitor is the dual 75 Hz HDMI 1.4 ports and single VGA port. You won’t find any picture-in-picture or split source modes though so you are limited to cycling through different sources like an ordinary TV.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

The box includes an HDMI cable and you could buy an HDMI to DVI cable if your motherboard or GPU only has DVI ports.

Basic set up & assembly

You do have a wee bit of set up; clicking the two-piece stand together, then screwing it into the protruding metal bracket o the back.

Speakers are okay

The tiny 2W built-in backfiring speakers are nothing to write home about as they sound similar to entry-level laptops, but I believe it’s a good addition for folks who don’t want to clutter their desk with external speakers just to get involved with a Zoom meeting. If you have a pair of headphones, you could plug them in the monitor’s 3.5mm jack which could come in handy if you positioned your desktop far from the monitor.

Screen quality

This monitor uses 1080 P resolution, which is not as sharp and precise as 4K. even so, it still gets the job done admirably for most basic tasks. Of course if you want that sharper resolution, it’s available on any number of monitors, but it will cost you a whole lot more.

The Sceptre 24-inch monitor uses a VA panel which greatly helps in the contrast ratio department. Blacks look remarkably deep and the color accuracy is pretty good (covering 95% sRGB). While I wouldn’t recommend using this monitor for professional graphics work due to the poor viewing angles which lead to kind of a washout effect, watching movies and basic work feels just fine and you can even turn on the Blue Light Shift option to filter out blue light minimizing eye strain.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

For gamers, there’s a 75 Hz refresh rate and you can improve the paltry 8ms response time by enabling the Overdrive option. Enabling Overdrive may introduce artifacts though. I don’t game, so I didn’t test this out.

My feelings overall are that this monitor is just fine, but nothing that’s going to blow your mind. If you’re just looking for a simple monitor to view things on a larger screen, or for kids to do homework on,  this is an ideal budget option. If you have need for colour precision, or razor sharp graphics or video work, this would not be my first choice. But as long as you know what you’re getting with this monitor, it could be a real wallet saver.

Overall review: Sceptre Monitor

Overall, this monitor is just fine. While it’s not much to look at in the design department, and the resolution is basic, it’s a fine monitor for those on a budget.

The Scepter 1080p 24-inch monitor is proof that you can get a decent display for a low asking price because most of your money goes towards the hardware with very little to spare on the branding. While I can agree that some established companies may offer better quality and higher resolution, I’m glad to see options like this exist for people who want a good combination of basic features without any major negatives, for a cheap price.

Sceptre, scepter 1080p monitor

When it comes to the downsides, there’s nothing wrong with this monitor per se. I mean, you could complain that the resolution isn’t as sharp, or that it’s not as aesthetically pleasing as other options, but if that’s the case, I would direct you to several other higher end monitors that you’d pay more for. With this one you’re getting basic monitor features at a great price.

I can recommend the Sceptre 24-inch monitor to you. It sells for about $205CAD/$129USD.

If you want to check out some other higher end options and 4K display panels, check out my reviews of LG, ViewSonic, and Samsung.


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